Your Rights and Responsibilities with Police

It's usually right that officers want what's best for you and your community, but it's also important to be aware of your rights and make sure you are protected. Police have the ultimate power - to take away our freedom and, sometimes, even our lives. If you are being questioned in a criminal defense case or investigated for a DUI or another crime, make sure you are protected by a good lawyer.

You May Not Need to Show ID

Many individuals are not aware that they aren't obligated to answer all an officer's questions, even if they were driving. If they aren't driving, they don't always have to show ID either. Federal law protects all of us and gives special protections that allow you to remain silent or give only partial information. You have a right not to give testimony against yourself, and you can almost always just leave if you aren't under arrest.

Even though it's important to have a solid education about your rights, you need a legal advocate who knows all the minutia of the law so you can protect yourself in the best way. Knowing all therules and being familiar with the multiple situations in which they apply should be left up to good laywers. Find someone whose main priority it is to be aware of these things if you want to prevail in any DUI or criminal defense case.

Know When to Talk

It's good to know your rights, but you should think about the fact that usually the police aren't out to harm you. Most are decent people, and causing an issue is most likely to hurt you in the end. You shouldn't want to make the police feel like you're against them. This is yet one more reason to get an attorney such as the expert lawyer at criminal defense attorney salt lake city, UT on your team, especially for interrogation. Your attorney can inform you regarding when you should speak up with information and when to keep quiet.

Cops Can't Always Do Searches Legally

Unless the police have probable cause that you are engaging in criminal behavior, they can't search your house or your car without permission. However, if you start talking, leave evidence of criminal activity in plain sight, or grant permission for a search, any data gathered could be used against you in court. It's probably smart to deny permission for searches verbally and let the courts and your attorney sort it out later.

[Top]

Your Rights and Responsibilities with Police

No one likes talking to police, for any sort of criminal defense or questioning, including DUI. You have both rights and responsibilities, all the time. It's always useful to get an attorney on your side.

Identification? Not Necessarily

Many people don't know that they don't have to answer all an officer's questions, even if they are behind the wheel. Even if you must show identification, you may not have to say more about anything such as your recent whereabouts and activities or how much you have had to drink, in the case of a DUI investigation. The U.S. Constitution protects all people and gives specific protections that provide you the option to remain quiet or give only some information. You have a right not to give testimony against yourself, and you have a right to walk away if you aren't being officially detained.

Even though it's best to have a basic education about your rights, you need a lawyer who gets all the small stuff of the law so you can protect yourself fully. State and federal laws change often, and differing laws apply based on jurisdiction and other factors. Find someone whose first responsibility it is to be aware of these things if you want to prevail in any DUI or criminal defense case.

Know When to Talk

While there are times to stay mute in the face of legal action, remember that most cops just want peace and justice and would rather not take you out. You don't want to make the police feel like your enemies. This is an additional reason to get an attorney such as the expert counsel at defense attorney slc on your side, especially during questioning. Your attorney can advise you on when you should speak up with information and when to keep quiet.

Cops Can't Always Do Searches Legally

Unless police officers have probable cause that you have committed a crime, they can't search your house or your car without permission. Probable cause, defined simply, is a reasonable belief that a crime is in progress. It's more complicated in reality, though. It's usually best to not give permission.

[Top]

Criminal Defense and Talking to Police

Even if police officers provide you with assistance or treat you with kindness and respect, having to meet with them is not a sought-after activity. Whether your situation involves violence, DUI, minor offenses or other criminal matters or drug, sex and white collar, it's important to know your rights and responsibilities. If you could be found guilt of crimes or could be indicted, contact a good lawyer as soon as possible.

Identification? Not Necessarily

^Many people are unaware that they don't have to answer all an officer's questions, even if they have been pulled over^. ^Even if you are required to show your ID, you may not have to say more about anything like where you've been or how much you have had to drink, in the case of a potential DUI arrest.^ ^These rights were put into the U.S. Constitution and have been verified by the U.S. Supreme Court.^ ^While it's usually best to cooperate with cops, it's important to understand that you have legal protections in your favor.^

^Even good guys need lawyers. Whether you have committed a DUI and pushed the limits of other laws or haven't, you should be protected.^ ^State and federal laws change often, and disparate laws apply jurisdictionally.^ ^Furthermore, laws regularly change during legislative sessions, and courts are constantly making new rulings.^

Know When to Talk

^It's best to know your rights, but you should think about the fact that usually the officers aren't out to get you. Most are decent people, and causing an issue is most likely to harm you in the end.^ ^You probably don't want to make cops feel like your enemies. This is yet one more reason to work with an attorney such as the expert lawyers at defense lawyer slc on your side, especially for interrogation.^ ^A good attorney in criminal defense or DUI law can help you know when to talk.^

Know When to Grant or Deny Permission

^In addition to refusing to speak, you can refuse to allow for a cop to look through your house or car.^ ^Probable cause, defined in an elementary way, is a reasonable belief that a crime is in progress. It's more complicated in reality, though.^ ^It's usually good to deny permission.^

[Top]